Kafkaesque: Stories Inspired by Franz Kafka

Dystopic and comedic, this anthology explores top fiction from generations of writers and artists who have drawn inspiration from Franz Kafka's writings. The stories in this illuminating collection include Philip Roth's alternate history in which Kafka survived into the 1940s and emigrated to America; Jorge Luis Borges' bizarre lottery that develops into a mystical system; Carol Emshwiller’s woman seeking to be accepted as officially male by a society of men; and Paul Di Filippo's hero who works as a magazine writer by day but is a costumed crime fighter by night. Rounding out the exceptional lineup is R. Crumb's humorous work, "A Hunger Artist" from Kafka for Beginners alongside a new English translation of the story itself. Each author also responds to the question Why Kafka? and discusses his writing, its relevance and relation to their own work, and his enduring legacy.

Contents

Introduction by John Kessel and James Patrick Kelly

"A Hunger Artist" by Franz Kafka (new translation by John Kessel)
"The Drowned Giant" by J.G. Ballard
"The Cockroach Hat" by Terry Bisson
"Hymenoptera" by Michael Blumlein
"The Lottery in Babylon" by Jorge Luis Borges
"The Big Garage" by T. C. Boyle
"The Jackdaw's Last Case" by Paul Di Filippo
"Report to the Men's Club" by Carol Emshwiller
"Bright Morning by Jeffrey Ford
"The Rapid Advance of Sorrow" by Theodora Goss
"Stable Strategies for Middle Management" by Eileen Gunn
"The Handler" by Damon Knight
"Receding Horizon" by Jonathan Lethem and Carter Scholz
"A Hunger Artist" by David Mairowitz and Robert Crumb
"’I Always Wanted You to Admire My Fasting’;
or, Looking at Kafka" by Philip Roth
"The 57th Franz Kafka" by Rudy Rucker
"The Amount to Carry" by Carter Scholz
"Kafka in Brontëland" by Tamar Yellin

Dystopic and comedic, this anthology explores top fiction from generations of writers and artists who have drawn inspiration from Franz Kafka's writings. The stories in this illuminating collection include Philip Roth's alternate history in which Kafka survived into the 1940s and emigrated to America; Jorge Luis Borges' bizarre lottery that develops into a mystical system; Carol Emshwiller’s woman seeking to be accepted as officially male by a society of men; and Paul Di Filippo's hero who works as a magazine writer by day but is a costumed crime fighter by night. Rounding out the exceptional lineup is R. Crumb's humorous work, "A Hunger Artist" from Kafka for Beginners alongside a new English translation of the story itself. Each author also responds to the question Why Kafka? and discusses his writing, its relevance and relation to their own work, and his enduring legacy.

Contents

Introduction by John Kessel and James Patrick Kelly

"A Hunger Artist" by Franz Kafka (new translation by John Kessel)
"The Drowned Giant" by J.G. Ballard
"The Cockroach Hat" by Terry Bisson
"Hymenoptera" by Michael Blumlein
"The Lottery in Babylon" by Jorge Luis Borges
"The Big Garage" by T. C. Boyle
"The Jackdaw's Last Case" by Paul Di Filippo
"Report to the Men's Club" by Carol Emshwiller
"Bright Morning by Jeffrey Ford
"The Rapid Advance of Sor... tümünü göster


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Baskı Bilgileri

Karton Cilt, 283 sayfa
Kasım2011 tarihinde, Tachyon Publications tarafından yayınlandı


ISBN
9781616960490
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